Results:
Category: Build Capacity

Mentoring What Matters Most written on a chalkboard with 2 photos of people being mentored. - Mentoring What Matters Most

Mentoring

Mentoring

What matters most when it comes to mentoring? The answer is simple: You just have to give a damn! After 30 years in the US Navy, some thought and reflection, I am convinced we have to be better mentors.

A male pilot stands facing the camera at sunset with Navy plane in background. - One Navy Team Full Circle

Full Circle

Full Circle

For Lt. j.g. Alex Orlando assigned to Patrol Squadron (VP) 30 the road to becoming Navy pilot wasn't a straight path but it finally came full circle.

A diver under water with his arm outstretched. - A Navy diver under water with his arm outstretched.

Diving Deeper Depths

Diving Deeper Depths

Since 2015, the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) has focused on the USS Oklahoma (BB-37), a Nevada-class battleship that was on Battleship Row in Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. After the Pearl Harbor attack, 429 deaths were confirmed from the USS Oklahoma. As of February, DPAA hit its first major milestone with the USS Oklahoma project, confirming a positive identity match of its 200th crewman.

A black graphic with the text E7 fts and reserves results behind a navy chief anchor. - E7 FTS & RESERVES RESULTS ILLUSTRATION

FY20 SELRES AND FTS CHIEF RESULTS

FY20 SELRES AND FTS CHIEF RESULTS

FY-20 SELRES and FTS chief selection board results have been released! Congratulations to the following personnel who have been selected for advancement to chief petty officer by the FY-20 SELRES and FTS Navy E7 Selection Board. Strong competition between qualified professionals is one of the strengths of our Navy and your selection speaks highly of your abilities.

Graphic Illustration of chief's cover with words USN Chief Quotas - E7 FY20 Quotas

Active-Duty Chief Quotas Released

Plan, Brief, Execute, Debrief

The Navy takes every available opportunity to maintain forward progress, staying on the front lines in how we fight and how we train. In his initial guidance to the Fleet, the Secretary of the Navy emphasizes that we “must improve our processes in order for our people to meet future challenges.”

Battle of Midway Pacific Ocean graphic illustration - Battle of Midway graphic illustration

Remembering the Battle of Midway

Remembering the Battle of Midway

Just after midnight on 4 June, Admiral Nimitz, based on patrol plane reports, advised Task Forces 16 and 17 of the course and speed of the Japanese "main body," also noting their distance of 574 miles from Midway. Shortly after dawn, a patrol plane spotted two Japanese carriers and their escorts, reporting "Many planes heading Midway from 320 degrees distant 150 miles!"

Security Reaction Force

Sailors are called to wear many hats in addition to their primary jobs while serving aboard a ship. All hands are trained to work together to fight fires, others have collateral duties such as financial counselors or fitness leaders. Some Sailors receive specialized training to form a highly trained tactical team known as a “Security Reaction Force” that responds to exceptional threats or attacks to the ship.

190405-N-DO437-1001.jpg - 190405-N-DO437-1001

Battle Group in the Sand

Battle Group in the Sand

Located on Virginia's Eastern Shore, the Surface Combat Systems Center (SCSC) at Wallops Island is the go-to site for combat systems developmental and operational testing as well as training in a maritime and littoral environment. The perfect location to test radars with ships and aircraft in the Virginia Capes Operational Area, it began 30 years ago as a test site for the AEGIS Weapon System — to include the radar. It has grown to include much more.

Hexagon shapes with light bulb, shield, pitch fork and other logos on them with "Li-Fi Technology" text - Li-Fi Technology in the U.S. Navy

Li-Fi Technology in the U.S. Navy

Li-Fi Technology in the U.S. Navy

Whether Sailors are aviation maintenance administrationmen documenting maintenance before an inspection or machinist mates looking up standard operating procedures for preventative maintenance on equipment in the main engine, a common problem they face aboard ships is the lack of access to a computer during crunch time.But what if it were possible